The Tailgaters Quick Reference Grilling Guide

Game Day Entertaining By Rebecca Gordon Buttermilk Lipstick Southern Hostess Editor-In-Chief Southern Cooking Baking Entertaining & Tailgating BrandGame Day Entertaining

Gridiron Grilling

Heat Wave

 Game day grilling plays a huge role in making certain football fanatics are well fed & happy during an afternoon of tailgating festivities. If you’re not a natural at the grill, then this guide is for you. With a few simple techniques, you’ll feel confident in preparing all sorts of delicious foods over or adjacent to an open flame. Smoky Bourbon & Coke Chicken Kabobs is the ideal recipe to feature that demonstrates the cooking differences between direct vs indirect heat. When you’re in need of exceptional flavor that can be delivered quickly, look no further than the clever bacon paste that is used to impart smoky notes in the kabobs. It’s blended with an array of pantry spices such as seasoned salt, cumin, pepper & garlic powder resulting in one flavorful combination that avoids the need to cook over indirect heat for the sake of flames engulfing the bacon due to the concentration of fat that would normally drip away during direct heat grilling. It can be done but there’s a good bit of babysitting involved. This method disperses the bacon instead & enables it to crisp quickly producing exceptional flavor, good texture & with the help of a little brown sugar in the blend, nice caramelization for a real beauty on the plate. Be certain to follow my general guidelines for using both direct & indirect heat cooking methods as outlined below to grill some of your favorite game day specialties.

Game Day Entertaining: Smoky Bourbon & Coke Chicken Kabobs & Charred Ranch Style Onion Dip By Rebecca Gordon Buttermilk Lipstick TV Cooking Personality Tailgating Expert Sports Entertaining Southern Hostess Tide & Tigers Today Tailgate Host WBRC Fox 6 Birmingham Alabama Tailgating Recipes Party Ideas & Crafts

rebecca gordon buttermilk lipstick Southern Recipes & How To's Easy Tailgate Recipes RebeccaGordon ButtermilkLipstickSmoky Bourbon & Coke Chicken Kabobs
makes 6 servings

Run The Option

A variety of wooden picks can be used to prepare the kabobs. Try a smaller length for bite-sized portions & larger ones for main dish fan fare.

Wooden skewers
Bourbon & Coke Barbecue Sauce
1/3 cup brown sugar
4 tsp low-sodium seasoned salt
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1/4 tsp black pepper
1/4 tsp cumin
4 bacon slices, cut into pieces
2 lbs boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into 1 1/2 inch pieces
2 {12-oz} green bell pepper peppers, cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces

Soak 12 {6-inch} wooden skewers in water for 30 minutes. Prepare the Bourbon & Coke Barbecue Sauce & set aside. Pulse the brown sugar, the seasoned salt, the garlic powder, the pepper, the cumin & the bacon in a food processor to form a paste. Thread the chicken & the peppers on the skewers & place in a dish. Rub the bacon mixture, using your hands, on both sides of the chicken kabobs.

Grill over direct Medium-High heat {350 to 400 degrees} 6 to 7 minutes per side, brushing with 1/2 cup of the Bourbon & Coke Barbecue Sauce after the kabobs have been turned. Remove the chicken skewers from the grill once the juices run clear. Serve with the remaining Bourbon & Coke Barbecue Sauce.

The Extra Point

Fill pita bread with chilled chicken & bell peppers. Top with mixed greens, red onion & white barbecue sauce for a tasty sandwich wrap.  

Game Day Entertaining: Smoky Bourbon & Coke Chicken Kabobs & Charred Ranch-Style Onion Dip By Rebecca Gordon Buttermilk Lipstick TV Cooking Personality Birmingham Alabama Pastry Chef Tailgating Expert Sports Entertaining Southern Hostess Tide & Tigers Today Tailgate Host WBRC Fox 6 Raycom News Network

rebecca gordon buttermilk lipstick Southern Recipes & How To's Easy Tailgate Recipes RebeccaGordon ButtermilkLipstickBourbon & Coke Barbecue Sauce
makes 1 1/2 cups

Game Changer

Dr. Pepper or ginger ale can be substituted in place of the co-cola for a zippier taste.

1 tsp vegetable oil
2 Tbsp minced yellow onion
1 {7-1/2 oz} can co-cola
1 cup barbecue sauce
1/4 cup bourbon
2 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1/4 tsp black pepper

Sauté the onion in the oil in a 2-quart saucepan over Medium-High heat 3 minutes or until softened. Deglaze the pan with the co-cola & cook 10 minutes or until reduced by 3/4. Stir in the barbecue sauce, the bourbon, the red wine vinegar & the pepper. Reduce the heat to Medium-Low. Bring to a simmer, stirring occasionally & cook 2 minutes. Remove from the heat. Use as directed.

The Extra Point

Try over burgers, pulled pork barbecue sandwiches or game day dogs to add a little variety.

Game Day Entertaining: Tailgating Recipes Crafts & Party Ideas By Rebecca Gordon Buttermilk Lipstick Sports Entertaining Southern Hostess TV Cooking Personality Birmingham Alabama Tide & Tigers Today Tailgate Host WBRC Fox 6FROM THE SOUTHERN HOSTESS OF BUTTERMILK LIPSTICK 
{helpful advice}

How To Grill Using Direct & Indirect Heat

With a few tips, you’ll feel confident at the grill. A little know-how goes long for a season of effortless tailgating specialties. Look to these pointers week after week to make your best grilled foods. Once you master these techniques, be sure to hone your skills by following The Tailgaters Quick Reference BBQ Guide & learn how to impart added smoky notes to an array of game day delectables.

rebecca gordon buttermilk lipstick Southern Recipes & How To's Easy Tailgate Recipes RebeccaGordon ButtermilkLipstick The Tailgaters Quick Reference Grilling Guide

Planning & logistics are key to any great gathering so put on your game face.
This straightforward playbook will prove to be indispensable.
Use it to get basic fires started on game day all season long.

No. 1
Direct Heat Grilling

Direct heat is used by cooking foods directly over the flame. As a rule of thumb, any item requiring a cook time less than 25 minutes is an ideal candidate for this cooking method. Kabobs, boneless chicken breasts, basic pork tenderloins, steaks, fish & vegetables are good contenders for this method. For even cooking, the food should be turned halfway through the time range specified in the recipe.

The Kettle Grill

Remove the cooking grate. Position the bottom grate securely. Stuff newspaper in the bottom of a chimney starter. Flip it over & fill the top with charcoal. Light the newspaper & place it on the bottom grate. Expect billowy smoke to emerge from the chimney starter after about 5 minutes. Once the charcoal catches fire, it will cast an orange glow. Eventually, the smoke will subside & after about 20 minutes, the briquettes will cast a gray glow. This is when they’re ready to place onto the bottom grate.

Using heavy duty oven mitts, carefully pick up the chimney starter by the handle & step back a bit while you pour the fiery, hot coals on the center of the bottom grate. Even them out a little with long handled tongs. Position the cooking grate securely. Swipe the grate with a grill brush. Place the food directly over the hot coals & follow individual recipe instructions to complete the cooking process.

The Gas Grill

Turn on or light both sides of the grill. Close the lid & allow the grill to preheat. When the temperature reaches between 350 to 400 degrees, swipe the grate with a grill brush. Position the food on the cooking grate directly over the flames. Follow individual recipe instructions to complete the cooking process.

No. 2
Indirect Heat Grilling

 Indirect heat is used by cooking foods adjacent to the flame over an unlit portion of the grill. As a rule of thumb, any item requiring a cook time more than 25 minutes is an ideal candidate for this cooking method. Foods with the bones still intact or larger meat cuts are good contenders for this method including whole chickens, ribs, pork shoulder, turkey & roasts.

The Kettle Grill

Remove the cooking grate. Position the bottom grate securely. Stuff newspaper in the bottom of a chimney starter. Flip it over & fill the top with charcoal. Light the newspaper & place it on the bottom grate. Expect billowy smoke to emerge from the chimney starter after about 5 minutes. Once the charcoal catches fire, it will cast an orange glow. Eventually, the smoke will subside & after about 20 minutes, the briquettes will cast a gray glow. This is when they’re ready to place onto the bottom grate.

Using heavy duty oven mitts, carefully pick up the chimney starter by the handle & step back a bit while you pour the fiery, hot coals on one side of the bottom grate. Even them out a little with long handled tongs. Position the cooking grate securely. Swipe the grate with a grill brush. Place the food on the empty side of the grate & follow individual recipe instructions to complete the cooking process.

The Gas Grill

Turn on one side of the grill. Close the lid & allow the grill to preheat. When the temperature reaches between 225 to 275 degrees, swipe the grate with a grill brush. Position the food over the unlit side of the grill. Follow individual recipe instructions to complete the cooking process.

No. 3
The Combination Two-Zone Method

The Two-Zone grilling method comes into play when you’re looking to sear a cut of meat & get some stellar grill marks but keep the exterior from getting too dark before the internal temperature is reached. After the desired caramelization is reached on both sides of the exterior portion of the cut, it’s moved to an unlit portion of the grill or adjacent to the flames to finish cooking. Ideal contenders for this method include ultra thick-cut steaks & pork chops, chicken thighs, chicken leg quarters & bacon wrapped pork tenderloin.

Game Day Tailgating & entertaining By Rebecca Gordon Buttermilk Lipstick Editor-In-Chief Southern Cooking Baking Entertaining & Tailgating Brandetc

Game Day Entertaining 101
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music to your ears
“Shake Your Tail Feather” Ray Charles

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About Rebecca Gordon

* Southern Born * Southern Bred * Tailgate Queen * Southern College Football Fanatic * SEC Tailgate Strategist * Southern Recipe Writer & Sometimes Novelist * Half-Hour Hostess * Media Personality * Houndstooth Hound Owner * Small Town Dreamer * Big Idea Doer * 3rd Generation Pimiento Cheese Fixer * Casserole Maker * Budweiser Drinker * Bourbon Cocktail Sipper * Peanut Butter Love Affair * Cookie Monster * Calorie Burner * Retainer of Useless Pop Culture One Liners * Terrible Dancer * Even Worse Singer but doesn't care * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Rebecca Gordon shares over 20 years of cooking knowledge in the instructional filled original editorial content on Buttermilk Lipstick as well as the cooking class format videos that can be found on her YouTube channel through regular collaboration with numerous media outlets. Gordon draws from an extensive background in corporate publishing spanning over 13 years on both the business and editorial side focusing on women’s southern lifestyle. She is a classically trained pastry chef and draws from fine dining restaurant experience from a James Beard award winning chef as well as her southern roots upbringing to share cooking, entertaining & style content relevant to today’s modern woman.

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