The Modern Southern Garden: Hummingbird Moths

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The Modern Southern Garden

The Profile

Hummingbird Moths

Planning a green space may be something you have recently decided to pursue whether you want to fill it with edibles, flowers or both. I have been gardening for over 25 years, scoured garden books poolside during that time & put the knowledge into action on several properties. I still find there is so much to learn & plenty to do all throughout the year. Although many plants feature textbook instructions on how they are expected to perform in certain locations, with general light requirements, growth expectations, etcetera– the true test of a specimen is whether it will actually thrive in your own micro climate. There is some trial & error associated with gardening & as you begin to fill beds with plants & seeds, you may notice slight temperature & humidity levels that fluctuate greatly even just a few feet apart. The Modern Southern Garden series is designed to guide you through the many facets of the process. It is more about a new approach to this old-fashioned art rather than a contemporary, minimalistic design aesthetic.

My personal green space is actually a hybrid between landscape design & a cottage garden that highlights many of my favorite southern blooms. It isn’t grand by any means & I say this so you know that a beautiful garden filled with wildflowers or a more sophisticated, organized space of roses can be planted wherever you happen to be even if it’s in containers on a window sill or deck. Once you determine how much time & effort you want to spend on maintaining your space, you’ll better know how to fill the beds accordingly & with the proper quantity of items. You’ll also need to understand that landscaping materials offer a more evergreen aesthetic while deciduous plants, perennials & annuals will lend a more organic & ever-changing appearance. The latter should peak seasonally– mine is designed to peak twice. Once in the spring & then in the summer so you should expect the maximum design you’ve chosen to last about a month or so depending on bloom length expectations of chosen specimens which is why different species are staggered & layered throughout beds. Once your garden is established, it’s pretty simple to maintain. The Modern Southern Garden will feature streamlined procedures, plant selection guidance & of course how to create arrangements with the flowers you have grown in your own yard but I’ll also focus on basic maintenance pointers, color selection & wanted or unwanted visitors you may find. If you have questions along the way, please do leave a comment & I’ll respond quickly. In the meantime, you many notice a Hummingbird Moth darting about in your own yard. Learn about this interesting garden insect & the benefits they have to offer.

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FROM THE SOUTHERN GARDEN OF BUTTERMILK LIPSTICK
{helpful advice}

How To Attract Hummingbird Moths Into The Garden

From spring to fall, it isn’t uncommon to see a flutter of activity near gardens filled with flowers. Hummingbird Moths may deceive you at first glance as they look a lot like bees & hummingbirds. Blooming flowers have long been the major attractor for their visit & you may even notice that they are partial to certain flowers. Learn about this particular insect so that you may identify them in your own green space.

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Hummingbird Moths belong to the Sphingidae family. They display mimicry which is why often times the moths are mistaken for hummingbirds. The ultra quick flapping of their wings & the fact that they are partial only to nectar-rich blooms are some of the similarities the two species share. Since birds are considered predators to moths, the mimicry characteristic offers protection from them. The Hummingbird Moth only feeds during the day which is quite different from many other moths which are mostly nocturnal insects. In mid-flight, these moths use their long tongues to sip nectar from some of the more long necked flowers. The Snowberry Clearwing Moth is one of many of these beneficial insects that appear late in the summer months ready to pollinate a variety of plants.

The Tune
“Buttons & Bows” Dinah Shore

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About Rebecca Gordon

* Southern Born * Southern Bred * Tailgate Queen * Football Fanatic * Buttermilk Lipstick Culinary & Entertaining Techniques Instructor * Cooking & Baking Tutorials * Media Personality * Baking & Pastry Artist * Gardener * Runner * Retainer of Useless Pop Culture One Liners * Terrible Dancer * Even Worse Singer * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Rebecca Gordon shares over 20 years of cooking knowledge in the instructional filled original editorial content on Buttermilk Lipstick as well as the cooking class format videos that can be found on her YouTube channel through regular collaboration with numerous media outlets. Gordon draws from an extensive background in corporate publishing spanning over 13 years on both the business and editorial side focusing on women’s southern lifestyle. She is a classically trained pastry chef and draws from fine dining restaurant experience from a James Beard award winning chef as well as her southern roots upbringing to share cooking, entertaining & style content relevant to today’s modern woman.

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