Cooking Classics: Hoppin’ John

Hoppin' John By Rebecca Gordon Editor-In-Chief Buttermilk Lipstick Culinary & Entertaining Brand Practical Culinary Techniques For Everyday Cooks Cooking & Baking Tutorials Pastry Chef Writer Food Stylist TV Cooking Personality Editorial Director Digital Culinary Photo Journalist Modern Southern Socials Game Day EntertainingCooking Classics

The Technique

Hoppin’ John

Hoppin’ John is a humble dish of cowpeas, dried local field peas, & rice originating from the Lowcountry. Traditionally, it was a prepared as a one dish meal that was a bit on the dry side however more modern renditions call for black eyed peas & instruct to serve them over the rice as an exact amount of liquid can be measured & used to prepare the recipe more accurately since a good deal of evaporation takes place during the cooking process. You’ll find more classic versions that season the peas with a smoked ham hock but I find that close to years end, just in time for New Year’s Day gatherings, a bit of diced Bourbon-Orange Baked Ham remaining from earlier festivities adds delicious flavor. Do not forego the toppings as the fresh flavor brightens the Hoppin’ John just so. Learn how to make an updated classic & follow my pointers for preparing this iconic Southern dish. 

Hoppin John By Rebecca Gordon Editor-In-Chief Buttermilk Lipstick Culinary & Entertaining Brand Practical Culinary Techniques For Everyday Cooks Editorial Director Digital Culinary Photo Journalist Pastry Chef Writer Food Stylist TV Cooking Personality Modern Southern Socials Game Day Entertaining

rebecca gordon buttermilk lipstick Southern Recipes & How To's Easy Tailgate Recipes RebeccaGordon ButtermilkLipstickHoppin’ John 
makes 6 servings

A smoked ham hock may be substituted for the diced smoked ham, if desired.

2 Tbsp vegetable oil
1 large sweet onion, diced
2 celery ribs, diced
1 cup diced smoked ham
3 garlic cloves, pressed
1 lb black eyed peas, soaked & rinsed
1 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 large sprig fresh thyme
1/2 tsp crushed red pepper flakes
1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
5 cups water
1 Tbsp chicken stock base
1 cup long grain rice
1/4 tsp kosher salt
Toppings: Diced plum tomato, scallions & parsley

Sauté the onion, the celery & the ham in a Dutch oven in hot oil over Medium-High heat 8 minutes or until softened. Add the garlic & cook until fragrant, about 20 seconds. Add the peas, the vinegar, the thyme, the crushed red pepper & the black pepper. Stir in the water & the chicken stock base. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to Medium & cook, uncovered, 30 to 35 minutes or until the liquid is reduced to approximately a 1/2 cup & the peas are toothsome-tender. Stir the mixture occasionally while cooking & add a little additional water if you feel that it is necessary. 

Meanwhile, bring 2 cups water & the salt to a boil over Medium-High heat in a 1-quart saucepan. Stir in the rice, cover with the lid & reduce the heat to Low. Cook 18 minutes. Remove the lid & fluff the rice with a fork. Remove the thyme stems from the black eyed pea mixture & serve over the rice. Season with additional kosher salt & sprinkle with the desired toppings. 

The Recipe Box. Rebecca Gordon Buttermilk Lipstick Southern HostessFROM THE KITCHEN OF BUTTERMILK LIPSTICK
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Cooking Basics: Rice By Rebecca Gordon Buttermilk Lipstick Editor-In-Chief Buttermilk Lipstick Culinary & Entertaining Brand Baking & Cooking Tutorials Digital Culinary Photo Journalist Pastry Chef Food Stylist Photographer Writer Editorial Director Southern Hostess Modern Southern Socials Game Day EntertainingHow To Prepare Hoppin’ John

Hoppin’ John has long been a traditional Southern dish prepared to symbolize a year of luck & prosperity. Over time, cowpeas peas have been replaced with black eyed peas as they are more readily available to consumers. The combination of peas & rice further work in harmony to provide a nutritionally sound complete protein. Learn how to make a slightly more updated version of this iconic southern dish. 

Hoppin John By Rebecca Gordon Editor-In-Chief Buttermilk Lipstick Culinary & Entertaining Brand Practical Culinary Techniques For Everyday Cooks Editorial Director Digital Culinary Photo Journalist Pastry Chef Writer Food Stylist TV Cooking Personality Modern Southern Socials Game Day Entertaining

rebecca gordon buttermilk lipstick Southern Recipes & How To's Easy Tailgate Recipes RebeccaGordon ButtermilkLipstickThe Technique

From soaking the black eyed peas to preparing the rice, Hoppin’ John is a relatively straightforward dish. A Dutch oven & a wooden spoon will be necessary in order to complete the task plus a few additional tools. Read over the recipe before beginning & mise en place the ingredients ahead of time. Here’s what you should know. 

Cooking Tutorials. Black Eyed Peas. How To Soak Dried Peas & Beans By Rebecca Gordon Buttermilk Lipstick Cuinary & Entertaining Brand Editor-In-Chief Practical Culinary Solutions For Everyday Cooks Cooking & Baking Tutorials Editorial Director Digital Culinary Photo Journalist Pastry Chef Writer Food Stylist TV Cooking Personality Game Day Entertaining Modern Southern Socials

No. 1

The Black Eyed Pea Preparations

Dried black eyed peas should be rehydrated before preparing the recipe in order to cut down on the cook time. Place them in a large bowl & cover with 6 cups of water. Allow the peas to stand at room temperature overnight. 

Cooking Basics: Rice By Rebecca Gordon Buttermilk Lipstick Editor-In-Chief Buttermilk Lipstick Culinary & Entertaining Brand Baking & Cooking Tutorials Digital Culinary Photo Journalist Pastry Chef Food Stylist Photographer Writer Editorial Director Southern Hostess Modern Southern Socials Game Day Entertaining1a

Drain the peas & rinse under cool water. The yield will equal approximately 6 cups once hydrated. For additional information on the subject including The Quick Soak Method, look to The Basics: Dried Black Eyed Peas.

Cooking Basics: Rice By Rebecca Gordon Buttermilk Lipstick Editor-In-Chief Buttermilk Lipstick Culinary & Entertaining Brand Baking & Cooking Tutorials Digital Culinary Photo Journalist Pastry Chef Food Stylist Photographer Writer Editorial Director Southern Hostess Modern Southern Socials Game Day EntertainingNo. 2

The Cooking Procedure

Sauté the onion, the celery & the ham in a Dutch oven in hot oil over Medium-High heat 8 minutes or until softened. Add the garlic & cook until fragrant, about 20 seconds. 

Cooking Basics: Rice By Rebecca Gordon Buttermilk Lipstick Editor-In-Chief Buttermilk Lipstick Culinary & Entertaining Brand Baking & Cooking Tutorials Digital Culinary Photo Journalist Pastry Chef Food Stylist Photographer Writer Editorial Director Southern Hostess Modern Southern Socials Game Day Entertaining2a

Add in the peas, the vinegar, the thyme, the crushed red pepper & the black pepper. 

Cooking Basics: Rice By Rebecca Gordon Buttermilk Lipstick Editor-In-Chief Buttermilk Lipstick Culinary & Entertaining Brand Baking & Cooking Tutorials Digital Culinary Photo Journalist Pastry Chef Food Stylist Photographer Writer Editorial Director Southern Hostess Modern Southern Socials Game Day Entertaining2b

Traditional recipes would not have called for chicken broth or a concentrated base blend, however it adds more depth to the dish. I prefer to use a chicken stock base as the salt levels can be controlled better & it provides a richer flavor compared to many broths available. Stir in the water & the chicken stock base. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to Medium & cook, uncovered, 30 to 35 minutes or until the liquid is reduced to approximately a 1/2 cup & the peas are toothsome-tender. Stir the mixture occasionally while cooking & add a little additional water if you feel that it is necessary. 

Cooking Basics: Rice By Rebecca Gordon Buttermilk Lipstick Editor-In-Chief Buttermilk Lipstick Culinary & Entertaining Brand Baking & Cooking Tutorials Digital Culinary Photo Journalist Pastry Chef Food Stylist Photographer Writer Editorial Director Southern Hostess Modern Southern Socials Game Day EntertainingNo. 3

The Rice

Bring 2 cups water & the salt to a boil over Medium-High heat in a 1-quart saucepan. Stir in the rice, cover with the lid & reduce the heat to Low. Cook 18 minutes. Remove the lid & fluff the rice with a fork. For additional information, look to The Basics: Long Grain White Rice.

Cooking Basics: Rice By Rebecca Gordon Buttermilk Lipstick Editor-In-Chief Buttermilk Lipstick Culinary & Entertaining Brand Baking & Cooking Tutorials Digital Culinary Photo Journalist Pastry Chef Food Stylist Photographer Writer Editorial Director Southern Hostess Modern Southern Socials Game Day EntertainingNo. 4

The Hoppin’ John 

Remove the thyme stems from the black eyed pea mixture & serve it over the rice. Season with additional kosher salt & sprinkle with the desired toppings. The main point is that the peas should still be a little firm in texture & not break down completely.

The Tune
“Isn’t This A Lovely Day” Billie Holliday

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* Southern Born * Southern Bred * Tailgate Queen * Southern College Football Fanatic * SEC Tailgate Strategist * Southern Recipe Writer & Sometimes Novelist * Half-Hour Hostess * Media Personality * Houndstooth Hound Owner * Small Town Dreamer * Big Idea Doer * 3rd Generation Pimiento Cheese Fixer * Casserole Maker * Budweiser Drinker * Bourbon Cocktail Sipper * Peanut Butter Love Affair * Cookie Monster * Calorie Burner * Retainer of Useless Pop Culture One Liners * Terrible Dancer * Even Worse Singer but doesn't care * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Rebecca Gordon shares over 20 years of cooking knowledge in the instructional filled original editorial content on Buttermilk Lipstick as well as the cooking class format videos that can be found on her YouTube channel through regular collaboration with numerous media outlets. Gordon draws from an extensive background in corporate publishing spanning over 13 years on both the business and editorial side focusing on women’s southern lifestyle. She is a classically trained pastry chef and draws from fine dining restaurant experience from a James Beard award winning chef as well as her southern roots upbringing to share cooking, entertaining & style content relevant to today’s modern woman.

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